Organised by

D/evolving Identities

13 - 14 September 2018

Mercure Manchester Piccadilly Hotel

Together with AFT Manchester

Presenters

Catherine Butler

 

 

Biography

 

Details coming soon...

 

 

Abstract

 

‘Solidarity and Singularity’

 

Catherine and John might well be described as being at quite different stages in their professional and personal lives.  This difference will be one of the contexts they use to invite conference participants to consider where you started from, where you are at and where you imagine you might be going.

Closing a conference tends to open up post-conference possibilities for your practice.  You may well be thinking about/inspired by the key notes and workshops you’ve been too, the conversations over a meal, at coffee time or in the bar.  In the midst of co-created experiences, each of us have had unique experiences of this conference and the experiences that constitute the conference. By the close of the conference we will all be sitting together and simultaneously each be in different places.  Our singular, unique experiences are produced within the flux and flow of each person’s relationships with others, some of whom we meet and know and others who we know of but may never meet.  What will we do with this ‘conference experience’?  How might we use it in the process of affirming, and transforming our own personal and professional i-dentities and we-dentities? What does this mean for our individual practice and for us as a profession? Where will you be ‘at’ this time next year?

John Burnham

 

 

Biography

 

John is a systemic psychotherapist working in the independent and public sectors.  His practice includes therapy, training, consultation and writing.  John has over 40 years experience working with families, couples and individuals. His main clinical work is with children, young people and families at Parkview Clinic in Birmingham where he is now employed as Consultant Family and Systemic Psychotherapist in the ED service and Director of the Training in Systemic Supervision.  As well as training widely in the UK he teaches in a variety of contexts including Scandinavia, and South America.  He has published numerous articles on the systemic approach to therapy, consultation, training and supervision.  He is sole author of the classic text ‘Family Therapy: First steps towards a systemic approach’, published by Routledge, and editor of the Special Edition of Human Systems known as ‘Voices from the Training Context’.  His model ‘Approach, Method and Technique’, Social GgRRAAAACCEEESSSSS (developed with Alison Roper-Hall) and PPRR (problems, possibilities - resources and restraints, are widely used in a variety of training contexts.  Currently he is working on a book on Systemic Supervision.

 

Abstract

 

‘Solidarity and Singularity’

 

Catherine and John might well be described as being at quite different stages in their professional and personal lives.  This difference will be one of the contexts they use to invite conference participants to consider where you started from, where you are at and where you imagine you might be going.

Closing a conference tends to open up post-conference possibilities for your practice.  You may well be thinking about/inspired by the key notes and workshops you’ve been too, the conversations over a meal, at coffee time or in the bar.  In the midst of co-created experiences, each of us have had unique experiences of this conference and the experiences that constitute the conference. By the close of the conference we will all be sitting together and simultaneously each be in different places.  Our singular, unique experiences are produced within the flux and flow of each person’s relationships with others, some of whom we meet and know and others who we know of but may never meet.  What will we do with this ‘conference experience’?  How might we use it in the process of affirming, and transforming our own personal and professional i-dentities and we-dentities? What does this mean for our individual practice and for us as a profession? Where will you be ‘at’ this time next year?

Prof Gerry Cunningham

 

 

Biography

 

Gerry hales from Northern Ireland and has been a practitioner there from the 1970s. He is a clinical psychologist and systemic therapist and has worked in a range of contexts and with a range of client populations. He spent many years in the juvenile justice system before moving into the NHS to head up psychology services in the Western Health and Social Care Trust. His main clinical specialism was that of CAMHS. He has extensive experience of running and teaching family therapy courses both in the Health Trust and Ulster University. He took early retirement from his NHS post in 2011 and set up his own company. Over the past seven years (of so called semi-retirement) his work has included delivering psychological therapies to the prison population in Northern Ireland, undertaking contract work for the Western Trust, private clients, providing supervision and heading up family therapy teaching at Ulster University. While deriving great satisfaction from these pursuits he contemplates full retirement, from financially remunerated work, on a daily basis. After all life is full of other challenges!

 

 

Abstract

 

The boy who jumped out of the bowl he was baked in – a psychotherapist’s tale!

 

Gerry will do what many people thinks he does best and spend a lot of time talking about himself! He will tell his story of growing up in Northern Ireland (or 'Norn Iron' as we locals would say!) with a catholic working class identity and how this and subsequent experiences at personal, professional and politico-social levels (including ‘The Troubles) have reflexively helped shape his journey as a ‘person practitioner’. He will attempt to story how the meanings he has attached to significant happenings and critical moments (as Jim Wilson might refer to them) have evolved over time. This story will include and hopefully be enriched by other voices – those of clients, students, supervisees and colleagues – that will help lend testimony to the values, principles and beliefs that have guided Gerry’s practice over the past four decades. Last, but not least Gerry hopes that conference participants will be able to make some reflexive connections between his story and their own!

Glenda Fredman

 

 

Biography

 

Glenda is a clinical psychologist, systemic family psychotherapist, trainer and supervisor. She is a former director of training in systemic psychotherapy, researcher, school teacher, motorbike rider and surfer. Glenda is committed to enabling systemic and ethical practice within public services where she has worked at all levels of organisations with people in therapy, with staff in training and with teams and organizations in consultation. She has recently co-edited Working with Embodiment in Supervision: A systemic approach (Routledge) and Collaborative Consultation in Mental Health: Guidelines for the new consultant (Routledge).

 

 

Abstract

 

Weaving our Personal and Professional Identities through Multiple Contexts of Selves

 

For me the word ‘Identity’ goes with ‘belonging’ - who we ‘are’ is not just shaped by who we want to be – but who will have us - where and who we can be.

 

We are living in times when many of us face re-descriptions of our identities; times when borders and walls are being created; times of reclassification, registration and accreditation to identify who is in and who is out, who belongs and whom to exclude, who is welcome and how we welcome.

 

I will draw on stories from my practice and my personal, professional and political lives to reflect on my relationship with different discourses of identity. As a migrant, coming from a long family history of migration, I will invite participants to bring the journey metaphor into our reflections on our professional identity stories.

Nasima Khanom

 

 

Biography

 

Nasima is a consultant specialist in independent private practice working in London. Nasima trained as systemic/family psychotherapist (Tavistock) and as a clinical supervisor (AFT). Nasima has portfolio of work, one of which is working with local mosque to provide disaster relief work with a high profile case Grenfell Tower Fire, in London.    Nasima is interested in bringing cultural sensitivity and faith based spirituality into her work. For more information about Nasima’s work please visit www.nasimakhanom.com.  Nasima lives in London with her daughter, enjoys walking in old cities full of history such as London including cultural diversity, exploring nature and spirituality.

 

 

 

Abstract

 

Trauma - Faith Based Resiliencies’ - Grenfell Tower Fire Disaster 14th June 2017

 

Nasima will talk about her community based clinical work with Grenfell Tower Fire survivors and witnesses to the disaster as a family therapist tailoring an unique bespoke approach to integrating faith and spirituality and cultural sensitivity in her work in working with faith communities within the Muslim tradition. Addressing loss, grief and trauma in an unprecedented crisis context; in building a space for ‘safe uncertainty’ and integrating Islamic faith based principles in addressing coping skills and resiliencies.

 

Nasima will share her reflections and learning about her practice in advancing social justice in mental health of faith communities. Nasima will share her unique bespoke therapeutic service tailor made based at a faith based mosque and community centre.  The themes addresses in the context of an unprecedented crisis on multiple levels addressing ‘Social Graces’ particularly of spirituality, faith and culture. Case studies will highlight faith based clinical interventions that is in congruent with Muslim beliefs which is not available from mainstream services.  The learning from this practice is shared with the hope that service providers will consider not only access issues but also culturally appropriate interventions both within the mainstream services but also faith based charity sector.

 

Jenny Altschuler

 

 

Biography

 

Jenny Altschuler is a Family Psychotherapist and Clinical Psychologist with considerable experience of working with people facing life-threatening illness, and with refugees and other migrants. Having worked for the NHS for much of her career she now works independently, offering psychotherapy to individuals and families, individual and team supervision and training for health care professionals. Jenny is also the Clinical Director of the One to One Children’s Fund, where her work includes setting up counselling centres for children and families affected by the war in Kosovo, and later for children with disabilities, projects for people affected by HIV/AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa, a counselling service for refugees and aid workers in Northern Greece and most recently a counselling and performing arts project for young refugees in London. Jenny has published widely on the impact of illness and migration on families including:

 

Migration, Illness and Health Care (2016) Palgrave McMillan

Counselling and Psychotherapy in Times of Illness and Death (2016) Palgrave McMillan

Working with Chronic Illness: A Family Approach (1997) McMillan

 

Abstract

 

Reworking identity/identities in the face of illness, disability and increased threat of death

 

This presentation draws research, clinical work and personal experience in reflecting on the ways in which individuals and families deal with the disruptions illness and disability pose to the life that might have been, with recommendations for clinical work and supervision. Emphasis is placed on bearing witness to suffering and loss and working towards re-authoring experiences of self and relationships with others. In view of the increased numbers of refugees, asylum seekers and other migrants requiring healthcare in the UK and elsewhere, the presentation explores the intersection between illness and migration, including situations where people are live apart from their family in a foreign culture, the culture of health care is markedly different, they are contending with other challenges related to post-migration life (such as discrimination) and the loss, trauma and bodily fragmentation associated with illness and medical treatment trigger feelings related to prior loss and trauma.

Nick Pendry

 

 

Biography

 

Nick is a brown-skinned Indian man who was adopted as a baby by a white-skinned English family. Nick is a qualified social worker, a family and systemic psychotherapist and a systemic supervisor. He has worked in children’s social care and in CAMHS settings and regularly contributes to the training of family therapists.

 

Nick is married to a woman, has two children and a labrador, and lives in south east London.

 

 

Abstract

 

A personal and professional story of the lifelong impact of transracial adoption.

 

This presentation will outline my personal story of transracial adoption, together with making connections between the personal and the professional. The impact upon the development of my identity and the the idea of belonging will be discussed, which cannot stand apart from the way in which the idea of “race,” and the impact of racism has affected my life. The ongoing development of self-reflexivity and the implications for my own practice and the practice of others will be addressed. The argument will be made that as our work takes place in a political context in relation to the themes identified, that we as practitioners are required to take political positions in our work. I hope that this presentation will both move and challenge you in relation to the positions that you take personally and professionally.

Any Questions?

 

 

Website and online booking provided by Mint Events.  If you have any questions regarding your registration or the conference, please contact:

 

John Bastock

Mint Events Ltd

T:  +44 (0)1270 750070

E:  aftconference@mintevents.co.uk

 

 

 

 

 

This conference is organised by the Association for Family Therapy & Systemic Practice.

 

The Association for Family Therapy

7 Executive Suite, St James Court, Wilderspool Causeway, Warrington, Cheshire, United Kingdom, WA4 6PS.

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